How to Make Your Own Book Trailer (for Kids)

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Whether you’re a kid at home trying to spice up a book report or a teacher at school trying to do the same thing, making a book trailer is a fun way to incorporate reading with technology and scriptwriting in a response to reading. Learn the steps and programs for how to make your own.

Like a movie trailer, book trailers give the audience enough juicy information to make them really, really want to read the book. (Hopefully.) Your job as a movie creator is to get your audience of other kids to want to READ the book you read!

Are you ready?

Before you start, watch a variety of book trailers. Research the possibilities. See what ideas you like in other trailers and want to try on your own. Take notes. Here are some options to get you started with your research:

Lost and Found Cat

Magic Tree House: The Night of the New Magicians

Bud, Not Buddy

I Survived the Great Chicago Fire

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library

All Four Stars

The Graveyard Book

how to make a book trailer

How to Make Your Own Book Trailer (for Kids)

  1. PICK A BOOK.

The first step, of course, is to select and read the picture or chapter book for your book trailer.

2. WRITE THE SCRIPT.

After you finish reading, it’s time to write a storyboard (or script) of how the trailer will go. (Download a storyboard template here.)

There are TWO PARTS to writing a storyboard — the visuals, what you’ll show on the movie screen and the audio, what narration (and music) will be happening with those visuals.

So on your storyboard, plan out each scene with the script of what will be shown visually as well as you’ll narrate or have written in text on screen.

Think in sequential order. Where will you start? What will you tell next? How do you want your mini-movie to end?

Don’t forget to tell viewers the name of the book and the author.

You won’t want to give away the ending but you do want to drop hints. Often, asking questions is a way to give a good hint. Something like — how will the kids survive? or will they ever see home again?

3. MAKE THE MOVIE.

When you’re done writing, pick one of the movie making programs or apps listed below.

Use your storyboard as a guide and start making the movie. Add in the visuals first with photos, drawings, or video clips. (If you’re searching for photos on the Internet, ask your parent or teacher for help to find royalty-free photos.)

The next step is to add in text, transitions, titles, and audio. If you’re narrating, make sure you speak loudly and slowly. If you need background music, check out this list of royalty free songs.

After you make your movie, share it with your audience. Upload to YouTube, SchoolTube, or Vimeo after getting permission from an adult. Sometimes you will have to export your movie to a different format. Ask an adult for help with this step.

There are many choices for your movie making — apps and desktop programs. I’ve listed many below.

Book Trailer Programs and Apps

Here is a list of online sites, programs, and apps that kids can use to make their own book trailers.

Animoto

Aurasma (program + app)

Google Slides FREE

Green Screen (app)

iMovie (program + app)

Kid Pix (program + app)

Movie Maker (Windows)

Puppet Pals (app) FREE

Shadow Puppet Edu (app) FREE

Sock Puppets (app) FREE

Spark Video FREE

Stop Motion Studio FREE

TeleStory (app) FREE

WeVideo

How to Make Your Own Book Trailer (for Kids) -- a great alternative to book reports!

 

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4 Responses

  1. Maureen Wehmeier says:

    This will be a great culminating project to book clubs. Thank you!

  2. Helen Dawkins says:

    I love your site! I have found many new interesting things i can do to foster learning all in one place!
    Thanks so much!

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  • WELCOME

    Hi! I’m Melissa Taylor, mom, writer, & former elementary teacher & literacy trainer. I love sharing good books & fun learning resources.

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