Writing in Secret Code Motivates Reluctant Writers

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Writing in secret codes or ciphers feels dangerous, even rebellious, to kids. As a result, it gets them writing. Even reluctant writers. (Especially if mom and dad don’t know how to break their code. Mahahaha.)

Learning About Secret Codes and Ciphers

1. Introduce ciphers. Have kids make their own reverse alphabet cipher (letters replacing letters) out of recycled cereal boxes and construction paper. A = Z, B = Y, C = X. I used these directions on the Crayola website to make the code breaker.

2. Give kids simple three letter words to decipher. Words like “fun.”

3. Ask kids to write the word “book” in the cipher.

4. Pair up and write each other notes in cipher. (I wrote everyone extra notes about books I thought they would like.)

5. Then, we wrote codes (numbers for letters) and changed partners.

6. Now, encourage kids to make up their own secret code using symbols to replace letters.

It’s nice to have a copier handy so you can make extra copies of their codes to give to their partners. One parent emailed me the next day and said her two boys spent the entire afternoon and evening writing in code. And still were going strong the next day!

Terms

code – for each letter of the alphabet, you substitute a number

decipher – breaking the code back into normal words

encrypt – writing a message in code

cipher / cryptogram– for each letter of the alphabet, you substitute another letter

writing in secret code 2

Motivate with Extensions

Learn more secret codes on Education.com, a Cub Scouts website or the Youth Online Club website.

Learn Morse Code.

Learn Pig Latin.

Learn about Hieroglyphic Codes.

Learn American Sign Language.

Go to the National Security Agency’s Crypto Kids website.

Buy a wooden decoder from Etsy.

Learn more or solve the brainteasers.

Learn about code breakers throughout history.

Write with invisible ink.

NonFiction Book Recommendations


Can You Crack the Code?
by Ella Schwartz


Codes, Ciphers, and Secret Writing
by Martin Gardner

spy science
Spy Science: 40 Secret-Sleuthing, Code-Cracking 
Spy-Catching Activities for Kids

mysterious messages
Mysterious Messages: A History of Codes and Ciphers

Fiction Book Recommendations

Jewel Fish of Karnak
The Jewel Fish of Karnak

39 clues
39 Clues

Chasing Vermeer
Chasing Vermeer by Blue Balliett


Book Scavenger by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman


Explorer Academy
by Trudi Trueit

Also Read:

Sticker Stories 
Writing Gifts for Kids

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  • WELCOME

    Hi! I’m Melissa Taylor, mom, writer, & former elementary teacher & literacy trainer. I love sharing good books & fun learning resources.

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