Sight Word Walls and Ideas

Sight words are words that kids need to know “by sight” – not sound out, not use picture clues, or any other strategies.

Recently, we started a Word Wall for JJ’s sight words — okay, a Word Refrigerator – so I thought I’d share about the Wall and some other ideas for learning sight words.

Repetition

Word Walls are great repetition and practice for beginning readers. JJ can practice the words she knows on the Wall, Refrigerator. Also, we like to add in some counting! JJ counts up the total number of words she knows; she feels so proud of herself knowing that she can read words.

Sight Words in Context

I like to teach sight words as we read books. Right now Cat the Cat books by Mo Willems are JJ’s favorite.

1. I’ll give her a sticky  note with a preprinted word like “the” and she’ll look for it while we’re reading. She adds this to her Word Wall after reading.

2. Other times we’ll read through the book. When JJ comes to a word she doesn’t know, I’ll tell her the word, we’ll practice it and try to find it again in the book. Finally, JJ will write the new word on the blank green sticky note for her Word Wall.

Resources

Printable FRY Sight Word List

Printable DOLCH Sight Word List

These are the Post-It Sight Words and Post-It Write Your Own Sight Words that we use.

I also have these Magnetic Sight Words.

More Sight Word Activities

Teach Mama has a fun Sight Word Bingo game. Here’s a Sight Word Bingo card creator.

Write the sight words in rainbow colors and cut up into an easy puzzle.

Make a Sight Word book.

Play this Sight Word Match Game on the computer

Download an iPad & iPhone Sight Word App.

see also:
Sight Word Games
Word Games for Kids
DIY Reading Pointers

Reading On the Go 

  • http://lettersnumbersandbooksohmy.blogspot.com/ welcome to our wonderland

    great post and sight words can be made fun to learn. :)

  • http://www.youthmuse.com Dana Houston Jackson

    Although the school my son attends does send home word cards that have words for him to learn by site, they take it one step further. They ensure the word itself is fully defined and he understands the word before they make him memorize the word by site.

    We find the combination method of ensuring the word is understood (with sentences to show usage) and the word cards to be very helpful.

    • http://imaginationsoup.net Melissa Taylor

      thanks, Dana. That sounds great.

  • Pingback: I See I Learn Books That Teach

  • Pingback: Inspire Writers With Lemony Snicket's 13 Words

  • http://kidsbookworm.net Kidsbookworm

    When my kids were toddlers, I made cards with words around the house and hung them with painter’s tape by the various items I was labeling. I made a card for every room, and some objects, like table, mirror, chair. Those aren’t sight words, but it helped the kids.

    We used a magnetic board and colored magnet strips that used an Expo 2 wipe off marker for our word wall. Others have used the refrigerator or freezer door. If you use 2/3rds of the area for new words and the rest for words that you have nearly mastered, it’s an easy way to keep track of progress and move the words off the wall to make room for more.

    The biggest hint – read, read, read with your kids.

  • http://www.tiftalksbooks.com Tif

    I am way behind in reading your blog, but I definitely have to save this link! Thank you so much for such a great resource!!

  • Pingback: it’s really me. . .

  • Pingback: Confessions of a Bad Kindergarten Mom

  • http://teachmama.com amy @teachmama

    Many thanks, Melissa, for this fabulous post–packed full of ideas and resources and including one of mine! What a surprise, and an honor, to be a part of it!

    cheers–
    amy

  • Pingback: A Munch-and-Slurp Pop Up Book For Hungry Giants

  • Pingback: Sensory Sand Trays Great for Letter Practice « Imagination Soup | Fun Learning and Play Activities for Kids